Research

Physical Literacy News

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Active Energetic Play versus Risky Play

Katie Jewitt, BCST and Paxton Bruce, BCST

Research Associates presented at the Alberta Child Care Association (ACCA) annual conference May 14, 2016

What is Risky Play? How do perceptions among parents, early childhood educators (ECEs), and licensing officers allow for active energetic play versus risky play in child care settings? This interactive discussion will address definitions, research, and identify barriers that restrict active energetic play.  Curriculum opportunities for bridging the gap between licensing regulations and accreditation standards for active energetic play will be explored both through presentation and through participant involvement.

  

Preschool Physical Literacy: Supporting Adults to Create Motivated, Confident, Competent and Resilient Children

Dawne Clark, PhD, Nancy Ogden, PhD, Katie Jewitt, BCST

The science is clear - the first five years of a child's life set the trajectory for lifelong learning, success, and health. Following the metaphor that building a child's brain is like building a house, adults who work with or parent young children need to pay attention to all four walls of the house - cognitive, social, emotional, and physical. Combined with attention to the other developmental domains, physical literacy is a crucial component of overall healthy development of children. And physical literacy builds "resiliency by design" as motivation, confidence, and competence (a simplified definition of physical literacy) are cornerstones to resilience. Over the past many months, Mount Royal and McMaster Universities have been collaborating with support from CS4L, the Trillium Foundation, and Alberta Sport Connect to test the preschool Physical Literacy Observation Tool (PLOT) for validity, reliability, and sensitivity in child care centres in both Ontario and Alberta. As part of these studies, a comprehensive set of materials, including an updated revision to the Hop Skip and Jump Resource Manual and Planning Guide, were developed to support caregivers in observing children's physical literacy, creating appropriate environments both indoors and out, and planning activities that encourage children to learn and develop skills through active play. This presentation will discuss current data from the testing of the PLOT and the related intervention materials to promote overall healthy development of resilient children.

International Physical Literacy Conference

 In June of 2015, Mount Royal Faculty and a Child Studies traveled to Vancouver to present at the 2015 International Physical Literacy Conference. Dawne Clark and Nancy Ogden, co-directors of the Centre for Child Well-Being, presented a session on the physical literacy observation (PLOT) tool. They explained how the PLOT is used to observe preschoolers’ physical literacy and the results of their assessments piloting it in child care centres and recreation programs.

Katie Jewitt presented a poster on research conducted by the CCWB. The poster, titled Physical Literacy: An Early Childhood Paradox examines early childhood educators attitudes, knowledge, and support for incorporating physical literacy into their child care programming. The definition for physical literacy is the motivation, confidence, and competence to move for a lifetime.

The International Physical Literacy conference is designed to bring together sport, health, education and recreation experts from around the world.

Students Deliver Physical Literacy Workshop

In April of 2015 Child Studies students, Katie Jewitt and Katelyn Hamilton, working within the CCWB, prepared and delivered a workshop titled Spark your Curiosity and Explore Active Play for the early childhood educators of the Banff Child Care and the staff at Calgary Metis Family Services.

Lindsay Jentzel, executive director for the Banff Child Care Centre commented “Many of my colleagues have commented on how much they enjoyed the workshop and the information shared.”

This month Katie and Katelyn had the excellent opportunity to present their physical literacy workshop for participants of the Alberta Child Care Association Conference in Calgary.   

Students Present Workshop to Child Care Workers

In April Child Studies students, Katie Jewitt and Katelyn Hamilton, working within the CCWB, prepared and delivered a workshop titled Spark your Curiosity and Explore Active Play for the early childhood educators of the Banff Child Care and the staff at Calgary Metis Family Services. 

Lindsay Jentzel, executive director for the Banff Child Care Centre stated “Many of my colleagues have commented on how much they enjoyed the workshop and the information shared.”

Developing Policy to Advance Physical Literacy in Child Care Settings in Alberta 

 It is no secret that Canadian children are not active enough. According to the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007-09), only 7% of children are meeting the daily recommendations for physical activity (Active Healthy Kids Canada, 2011).  Advancing Physical Literacy Canadian Sport for Life.

January 2013 Canadian Sport for Life Conference 

Enhancing Physical Literacy and Physical Activity amongst Children in Licensed and Approved Child Care Settings through Policy Development   

2011-2012 Developing Policy to Advance Physical Literacy in Child Care Settings in Alberta 

A pan-Alberta Advisory Committee came together to tackle the physical inactivity dilemma, in relation to licensed and approved child care across Alberta. The Committee worked to create a physical literacy policy for Alberta child care settings that may leverage motivation among professionals and organizations to make a difference. The purpose of this article is to share our experiences in helping to create such a policy. 

2007-2009 Mosaic Primary Care Network, IHI, Alberta Health Services, Child and Family Services, AB Sport and Recreation Cultural Considerations for Preschool Physical Literacy 

Over the past 2 years, CHST and ELCC students have explored physical activity for preschoolers in child care settings, resulting in a resource manual in 2009 entitled: A Hop, Skip, and a Jump. This term, students are exploring cultural understandings and expectations of physical activity for preschoolers among new immigrant families to support wellness initiatives. The final report “Cultural Understanding of Preschool Activity” was developed for the Mosaic Primary Care Network.