Environmental Health & Safety

Safety resources


This page offers additional health and safety resources from our external partners.

 

Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Act, Regulation, and Code
 

 Archived Newsletters







MRU Health & Safety Newsletter

                                                 
Environmental Health & Safety

 
What’s new?
 

The MRU EH&S Ergonomics Program has been posted on the EH&S website.

Please review to learn more about

  • stakeholder responsibilities

  • medical accommodations

  • strategies for ergonomically safe workstation adjustments and;

  • key contacts for ergonomic assessments

Here is an ergonomic self assessment so you can ensure your assigned workstation is ergonomically safe.

Ergonomic hazards affect all employees at MRU, regardless of their role or the tasks they complete.

An ergonomic hazard is a physical factor within the environment that may harm the musculoskeletal system. Examples of ergonomic hazards include:
  • Holding a body position, such as sitting,  for extended periods of time

  • Glare from a computer screen

  • Manual lifting of heavy loads

Ergonomic hazards may lead to long term issues so it’s important that any discomfort is addressed in a timely manner. Refer to the Ergonomics Program if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Looking for more information on Ergonomics?

 

The Canadian Centre of Occupational Health & Safety (CCOHS) is a trusted advisor on health and safety topics across Canada.

Below are links from the CCOHS with useful ergonomic information:


Sit-Stand workstations

If you have a Varidesk sit-stand or are using an alternate sit-stand workstation, here are some pointers to avoid making common standing mistakes.
 
 

Alberta Occupational Health & Safety
 

Under Alberta Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) legislation, only manual handling is legislated (Alberta OHS Code Part 14 - Sections 210-211). Other ergonomics concerns fall under the Employer's general duties to identify and reduce hazards, as outlined in Part 2 of the Alberta OHS Code.

 

Test Your Knowledge

Find the missing information in the MRU Ergonomics Program and assess if your body is sitting at neutral at your workstation. (12 blanks)
 

Image retrieved from: https://sites.ewu.edu/ehs/occupational-health-safety/ergonomics/


 

If you have suggestions on future newsletter content, please emailehs@mtroyal.ca with your suggestion. We would love to hear from you!

 
Copyright ©
2019
EH&S, Mount Royal University
All rights reserved.

 
Contact us:
ehs@mtroyal.ca

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Health & Safety Newsletter                                        

 
What’s new?

EH&S has released a Safe Work Practice: Workplace Housekeeping.

Why?

Effective house keeping is a cost effective way to improve workplace health and safety. It can help control or eliminate workplace hazards. If the sight of paper, debris, clutter and spills is accepted as normal, then other more serious hazards may be taken for granted.

House keeping is not just cleanliness. It includes:
  • keeping work areas neat and orderly
  • maintaining work areas and floors free of slip and trip hazads
  • removing waste materials (e.g paper, cardboard, food) and other fire hazards from work areas.
Effective house keeping results in:
  • fewer tripping and slipping incidents in clutter-free and spill-free work areas
  • decreased fire hazards
  • lower worker exposures to various substances (e.g dusts, vapours)
  • better control of tools and materials, including inventory and supplies
  • better hygienic conditions
  • more effective use of space
  • reduced property damage by improving preventive maintenance
  • improved morale
  • improved productivity

Spring is a great time for cleaning and de-cluttering. Take a few minutes to clean and tidy your work area before heading off on your summer break.

Good things to consider are areas that haven’t been dusted in a while, piles of paper that need to be filed or scanned, or stashes of food or clothing that you won’t need again this year. Future-you will appreciate the clean slate when you’re back from vacation.

 
 

Looking for more information on housekeeping?
 

The Canadian Centre of Occupational Health & Safety (CCOHS) is a trusted advisor on health and safety topics across Canada.

Below are links from the CCOHS with useful house keeping information:

Example house keeping checklists:
 

Alberta Occupational Health & Safety

Under Alberta Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) legislation, housekeeping is identified in Alberta OHS Code Part 12 - Section 185. 

 
Copyright ©
2019
EH&S, Mount Royal University
All rights reserved.

 
Contact us:
ehs@mtroyal.ca

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You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.