Faculty & Staff Resources

Faculty and Staff - Featured Resources

What is Indigenization? Mount Royal University is undertaking the campus-wide process of Indigenization by upholding the guiding principles and pursuing the goals listed in our Indigenous Strategic Plan . It is our goal "to respect and embrace Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing, to integrate Indigenous teachings and practices and to honour Indigenous experiences and identities" both in the classroom and across the institution.

Below you will find a list of academic resources that define and exemplify Indigenization, including lists of featured resources and an extensive, downloadable bibliography.

Battiste, Marie and James (Sa'ke'j) Youngblood Henderson. " Naturalizing Indigenous knowledge in Eurocentric education ." Canadian Journal of Native Education 32 (2009): 5-18.

CBC Radio. " "Universities don't become different just by wishing for it": Eve Tuck on the challenge of changing academia ." 26 February 2018. http://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/decolonizing-the-classroom-is-there-space-for-indigenous-knowledge-in-academia-1.4544984/universities-don-t-become-different-just-by-wishing-for-it-eve-tuck-on-the-challenge-of-changing-academia-1.4547278

Findlay, Len. " Always Indigenize! The radical humanities in the postcolonial Canadian University ." ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature 31, no. 1 (Jan-April 2000): 307-326

Gaudy, Adam, and Danielle Lorenz. “Indigenization as Inclusion, Reconciliation, and Decolonization: Navigating the Different Visions for Indigenizing the Canadian Academy.” AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 4, no. 3, pp. 218–27. 2018.

Ottmann, Jacqueline.
"Indigenizing the Academy: Confronting "Contentious Ground. " The Morning Watch: Educational and Social Analysis 40, nos. 3-4 (Winter 2013): 8-24.

Pidgeon, Michelle. " More than a Checklist: Meaningful Indigenous Inclusion in Higher Education. " Social Inclusion 4, no. 1 (2016): 77-91.

What are Indigenized curricula and pedagogies?

Lowan-Trudeau, Gregory. " Narrating a Critical Indigenous Pedagogy of Place: A Literary Métissage ." Educational Theory 67, no. 4 (2017): 509-525.

Ragoonaden, Karen and Lyle Mueller. " Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Indigenizing Curriculum. ." Canadian Journal of Higher Education 47, no. 2 (2017): 22-46.

Simpson, Leanne Betasamosake. "Land as Pedagogy: Nishnaabeg Intelligence and Rebellious Transformation ." Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society 3, no. 3. (2014).

What are Indigenized research methods/practices?

Archibald, Jo-Ann. "Indigenous Storywork Methodology ." In Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, Examples and Issues. Eds. Knowles, Gary J. and Ardra L. Cole. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2008. 371-384.

Kovach, Margaret. Indigenous Methodologies: Characteristics, Conversations and Contexts. Toronto: UofT Press, 2009.

Wilson, Shawn. Research is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods . Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, 2008.

Wilson, Shawn. “What is an Indigenous Research Methodology?” Journal of Native Education. vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 175-179. 2001.

What is decolonization? In Goal 1 of Mount Royal University's Indigenous Strategic Plan, we have set out to "cultivate respectful and welcoming environments that prevail over the legacy of colonization": a legacy which academic institutions in the West have a played central role in building. The work of decolonizing the university is critical to our larger goal of Indigenizing.

Below you will find academic resources that define and exemplify decolonization, including lists of featured resources and an extensive, downloadable bibliography.

Cote-Meek, Sheila. Colonized Classrooms: Racism, Trauma and Resistance in Post-secondary Education . Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, 2014.

Davis, Lynne et. al. "
Special Issue: Pathways of Settler Decolonisation ." Settler Colonial Studies 7, no. 4 (2017).
McFarlane, Peter and Nicole Schabus. Eds. Whose Land is it Anyway? A Manual for Decolonization. Vancouver: Federation of Post-Secondary Educators of BC, 2017. http://fpse.ca/sites/default/files/news_files/Decolonization%20Handbook.pdf

Tuck, Eve and K. Wayne Yang. "
Decolonization is not a Metaphor ." Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and Society 1, no. 1 (2012): 1-40.

Wilson, Angela Cavender. "
Reclaiming our Humanity: Decolonization and the Recovery of Indigenous Knowledge ." In Indigenizing the Academy: Transforming Scholarship and Empowering Communities. Eds. Mihesuah, D.A. and A.C. Wilson. Lincoln: University of Nebraska, 2004. 69-87.What are Decolonized Curricula and Pedagogies? Grande, Sandy. " Red Pedagogy: The Un-Methodology ." In Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies. Norman
K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln and Linda Tuhiwai Smith. Eds.
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2008. 233-254.

Iseke-Barnes, Judy M. "
Pedagogies for Decolonizing ." Canadian Journal of Native Education 31, no. 1 (2008): 123-148.

Pete, Shauneen. "
Idle No More: Radical Indigeneity in Teacher Education ." In Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Working towards Decolonization, Indigeneity, and Interculturalism. Pirbhai-Illich, Fatima, Shauneen Pete and Fran Martin. Eds. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. 53-72.What are Decolonized Research Methods/Practices? Gaudry, Adam. " Researching the Resurgence: Insurgent Research and Community-Engaged Methodologies in 21st-Century Academic Inquiry. " In Research as Resistance: Revisiting Critical, Indigenous and Anti-Oppressive Approaches. 2nd edition. Susan Strega and Leslie Brown. Eds. Toronto: Canadian Scholars' Press, 2015. 243-265.

Kievit, Joyce Ann. "
A Discussion of Scholarly Responsibilities to Indigenous Communities ." The American Indian Quarterly 27, nos. 1&2 (2003): 3-45.

Smith, Linda Tuhiwai.
Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples . 2nd Ed. London: Zed Books, 2012.

Smith, Graham Hingangaroa, and Linda Tuhiwai. “Doing Indigenous Work: Decolonizing and Transforming the Academy.” Handbook of Indigenous Education, January, pp. 1–27. 2018.

Examples of respectful and inclusive pedagogies and curricula In Goal 5 of Mount Royal University's Indigenous Strategic Plan , we have set out to "promote culturally responsible and respectful curricula that integrates Indigenous pedagogies and ways of knowing."

Below you will find scholarly resources that describe and exemplify responsible and respectful curricula and pedagogies, including a list of featured resources and an extensive, downloadable bibliography.

Grande, Sandy. " Red Pedagogy: The Un-Methodology ." In Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies. Norman
K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln and Linda Tuhiwai Smith. Eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2008. 233-254.

Iseke-Barnes, Judy M. "
Pedagogies for Decolonizing ." Canadian Journal of Native Education 31, no. 1 (2008): 123-148.

Lowan-Trudeau, Gregory. "
Narrating a Critical Indigenous Pedagogy of Place: A Literary Métissage. " Educational Theory 67, no. 4 (2017): 509-525.

Pete, Shauneen. "
Idle No More: Radical Indigeneity in Teacher Education ." In Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Working towards Decolonization, Indigeneity, and Interculturalism. Pirbhai-Illich, Fatima, Shauneen Pete and Fran Martin. Eds. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. 53-72.

Ragoonaden, Karen and Lyle Mueller. "
Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Indigenizing Curriculum ." Canadian Journal of Higher Education 47, no. 2 (2017): 22-46.

Simpson, Leanne Betasamosake. "Land as Pedagogy: Nishnaabeg Intelligence and Rebellious Transformation ." Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society 3, no. 3. (2014).

Culturally responsive and respectful research practices Goal 2 of Mount Royal University's Indigenous Strategic Plan is to "foster respect for Indigenous ways of knowing and knowledge-production to increase capacity for Indigenous scholarship," in order to build a culture of respectful research, encourage and support collaborative and community-based research initiatives, and develop an Indigenous research policy.

Below you will find scholarly resources that describe and exemplify responsible and respectful research practices, including a list of featured resources and an extensive, downloadable bibliography.

Archibald, Jo-Ann. "Indigenous Storywork Methodology ." In Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, Examples and Issues. Eds. Knowles, Gary J. and Ardra L. Cole. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2008. 371-384.


Gaudry, Adam. " Researching the Resurgence: Insurgent Research and Community-Engaged Methodologies in 21st-Century Academic Inquiry. . "In Research as Resistance: Revisiting Critical, Indigenous and Anti-Oppressive Approaches. 2nd edition. Susan Strega and Leslie Brown. Eds. Toronto: Canadian Scholars" Press, 2015. 243-265.

Kievit, Joyce Ann. " A Discussion of Scholarly Responsibilities to Indigenous Communities ." The American Indian Quarterly 27, nos. 1&2 (2003): 3-45.

Kovach, Margaret. Indigenous Methodologies: Characteristics, Conversations and Contexts. Toronto: UofT Press, 2009.

Kovach, Margaret. “Conversational Method in Indigenous Research” Special Issue: Celebrating 15 Years of Wisdom. First Peoples Child & Family Review. vol. 14, no, 1, pp. 123-136. 2019.

Smith, Linda Tuhiwai. Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples . 2nd Ed. London: Zed Books, 2012.

Wilson, Shawn. Research is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods . Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, 2008.

What are Indigenous knowledges and ways of knowing?

As Mount Royal University pursues its goal "to respect and embrace Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing, to integrate Indigenous teachings and practices," we are committed to learning about and understanding those knowledges, ways of knowing, teachings and practices.

We acknowledge that Indigenous knowledges and ways of knowing are rich, complex and highly diverse. They are resilient and deeply rooted in place and community. They have endured and resisted the violence of colonization, and their intrinsic value and importance can and should be understood independent of comparisons with Western knowledges and ways of knowing.

Below you will find scholarly resources that discuss diverse Indigenous knowledges, teachings, practices, and ways of knowing. This includes a list of featured resources and an extensive, downloadable bibliography.

Absolon, Kathleen E. Kaandossiwin: How We Come to Know. Fernwood Books. 2001.

Bastien, Betty.
Blackfoot Ways of Knowing: the Worldview of the Siksikaitsitapi . Calgary: UofC Press, 2004.

Battiste, Marie and James (Sa'ke'j) Youngblood Henderson. "
Chapter 2: What Is Indigenous Knowledge? " In Protecting Indigenous Knowledge and Heritage: A Global Challenge. Saskatoon: Purich Publishing, 2000. 35-56.

Bear Cheif, Roy (Siksika Nation) and Spence, Doreen (Saddle Lake Cree Nation) (2019). Reconciliation through Kimma Pi Pitsin - Kindness Compassion. Teachings gifted to Mount Royal University. Retrieved from http://www2.mtroyal.ca/~areil/ kimma/story_html5.html

Coulthard, Glenn. "Place against Empire: Understanding Indigenous Anti-Colonialism ." Affinities: A Journal of Radical Theory, Culture, and Action 4, no. 2 (Fall 2010): 79-83.

Cruikshank, Julie. Do Glaciers Listen? Local Knowledge, Colonial Encounters, and Social Imagination . Vancouver: UBC Press, 2005.

Ermine, Willie. "
Aboriginal Epistemology ." In First Nations Education in Canada: The Circle Unfolds. Marie Battiste and Jean Barman. Eds. Vancouver: UBC Press, 1995. 101-112.

Kermoal, Nathalie and Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez. Eds.
Living on the Land: Indigenous Women's Understanding of Place . Edmonton: Athabasca University Press, 2016.

Kimmerer, Robin Wall.
Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teaching of Plants . Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2013.

Little Bear, Leroy. "
Jagged Worldviews Colliding ." In Reclaiming Indigenous Voice and Vision. Marie Battiste, Ed. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2000. 77-85.

Umeek E. Richard Atleo.
Principles of Tsawalk: An Indigenous Approach to Global Crisis. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2011