Discovering the right fit for a meaningful career

MRU alumna returns to further her focus


Brye Robertson wearing her cap and gown on Convocation day.

Brye Robertson credits the Mount Royal community for shaping her career both in and out of the classroom.


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Brye Robertson is a graduate of the Bachelor of Child Studies – Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) program, and is now pursuing a social work diploma at Mount Royal University. As an Indigenous woman, Robertson prioritized finding a school with a strong Indigenous support centre.

“I wanted to feel at home. I was very particular about coming to Mount Royal because the school’s views aligned with my own. Out of all the universities I considered, I felt that Mount Royal was the most progressive — and that’s where I wanted to be,” Robertson says.

Robertson started in the open studies program before enrolling in the ELCC program. She credits the experiential learning in making the program so special.

“You can choose your practicums based on where you think you’ll want to end up after your degree. The profs are there to support you along the way and they’ll never leave your questions unanswered,” says Robertson. She continues, “The hands-on learning is something you’ll get at Mount Royal that I can’t guarantee you’ll get at any other school.”

Robertson is now enrolled in the Social Work program, after further researching Indigenous children in care and the effects of colonization while completing her ELCC degree.

“I’m going to take everything that I learned through my ELCC degree into my social work. I still want to work with Indigenous children, but I want to focus on helping children in care, keeping children out of care and keeping families together,” Robertson says.


"The hands-on learning is something you’ll get at Mount Royal that I can’t guarantee you’ll get at any other school."

Brye Robertson


Robertson also credits the Mount Royal community for shaping her career both in and out of the classroom.

“Mount Royal helped me reach my fullest potential in school by providing access to resources like the Iniskim Centre, the library and quiet study spaces,” says Robertson. She adds, “I met another Indigenous student who was very outspoken about Indigenous issues. I was always passionate about reading about the effects of colonization and residential schools, but she helped me become more vocal about these issues than I was before.” Robertson says.

Robertson also viewed one of the instructors in the Bachelor of Child Studies faculty as a mentor.

“From my first semester to my last semester, if I was ever struggling she would do everything she could to help. She was always there to support me, not only in my school work but also in my beading business,” Robertson says.

In addition to being a full-time student, Roberson is the owner of Urban Inuk Creations, which sells handcrafted jewelry and face masks. After spending her childhood watching her mother bead and sew, Robertson began beading herself. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, she began sewing scrub bags and masks for frontline workers.

“I’m grateful for everyone who supports my business because it allows me to support my community and other local artists,” Robertson says.

April 14, 2021