Carmen Nielson

Carmen Nielson

Education:
BA University of Calgary
MA Queen's University, Kingston
PhD Queen's University, Kingston

Office: EA 3131
Email: cnielson@mtroyal.ca

Research Interests:
Canadian history (19th c.) gender, politics, cultural history, visual culture

Current Research Project:
The Materials to Make Any Kind of Man: Satiric Art in Grip Magazine, 1873-1894 examines 19th-century Canada’s most influential example of political graphic satire. It brings insights from visual culture theory to bear upon historians’ understanding of late Victorian Anglo-Canadian politics and situates Grip within a transnational cultural field vis-à-vis the British magazine Punch and other similar magazines in the British Empire.

 
Courses Taught:
HIST 1131 (Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada, 1497-1877)
HIST 2108 (Gender in Canada)
HIST 2202 (Historian’s Craft)
HIST 3304 (Children and Youth)
HIST 4404 (Masculinities)
HIST 4406 (Gender, Sexuality, and the Body)

Selected Publications:
Edited with Nancy Janovicek, Reading Canadian Women’s and Gender History.  Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019.

“A Much-Fathered Nation: Feminist Biography and Confederation Politics.” Special Issue: Historical Perspectives: Confederation, Biography, and Canadian History.  Canadian Historical Review 98, 2 (2017): 356-374.

“Erotic Attachment, Identity Formation, and the Body Politic: The Woman-as-Nation in Canadian Graphic Satire, 1867–1914.’’ Gender and History 28, 1 (2016): 102-126.

“Caricaturing Colonial Space: Indigenized, Feminized Bodies and Anglo-Canadian Identity, 1873-1894.” Canadian Historical Review 96, 4 (2015): 473-506.

Private Women and the Public Good: Charity and State Formation in Hamilton, Ontario, 1846-93. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2014.

Awards and Grants:
(2019-20) SSHRC Explore for The Materials to Make Any Kind of Man: Satiric Art in Grip Magazine, 1873-1894.

(2015) Hilda Neatby Prize for the best English-language article on women’s and gender history published in Canada for “Caricaturing Colonial Space: Indigenized, Feminized Bodies and Anglo-Canadian Identity, 1873-1894.” Canadian Historical Review 96, 4
(2015): 473-506.