Journey to Indigenization

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Sept. 22 to Oct. 4, 2021

 

 

Sept 20 — Every Child Matters orange t-shirts will be available for purchase at the Cougars Campus Store. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Orange Shirt Society & MRU's Indigenous Student Emergency Fund.

 

Support Indigenous writers. Purchase an Indigenous-written book from the Cougars Campus Store.

 

Materials by Indigenous writers and about indigenization and decolonization will be displayed on the first floor of the Riddell Library and Learning Centre and available to borrow.

 

Iniskim Centre will have a food donation box located in T110. Donate non-perishable food items for families & children's lunches. Donations will be shared with our Indigenous Family Housing students & SAMRU. Discover more ways to donate.

Event Updates

The Journey to Indigenization: Truth, Reconciliation and Decolonization schedule of events is subject to change. If you'd like to receive updates, please fill out this form. 

 

 

One of the Numbered Treaties made between the Government of Canada and the Plains First Nations, Treaty 7 was signed on September 22, 1877, by the following five First Nations: the Siksika, Kainai, Piikani, Îyârhe Stoney Nakoda and Tsuut'ina, as did commissioners representing the British Crown and Canada.

At the time, the Canadian government was dedicated to building a transcontinental railway, and Treaty 7 permitted tracks to run across the Indigenous lands in what's now known as southern Alberta.

Many Indigenous people say this was the beginning of the end of their traditional way of life and the start of a new way of life-based on treaty cooperation and coexistence with non-Indigenous peoples. We are all treaty people.

 

Pipe Ceremony and Face Painting

Due to COVID-19, this event has been postponed.


Steve Kootenay-Jobin, housing and events coordinator, Iniskim Centre


Breakfast Feast

Due to COVID-19, this event has been postponed.


Steve Kootenay-Jobin, housing and events coordinator, Iniskim Centre


Opening Blessing

Due to COVID-19, this event has been postponed.


Steve Kootenay-Jobin, housing and events coordinator, Iniskim Centre


Guest Speaker: Former Chief Leroy Wolf Collar, Siksika Nation

Leroy Wolf Collar will speak about the signing of Treaty 7 in 1877. He is the author of First Nations Self-Government — 17 Roadblocks to Self-Determination. (2020)


 Wed. Sept. 22

11 a.m. – noon, MDT

Online — Google Live Stream


 Andrew Bear Robe, PhD, indigenization consultant, Bissett School of Business


jemmy jock bird book launch with southern alberta art gallery (saag)

dr. linda manyguns launches her book jemmy jock bird in association with the southern alberta art gallery (saag).

jemmy jock bird was a skilled translator, speaking seven Indigenous languages as well as english. he was respected and trusted by both parties, which was crucial in coming to an agreement. manyguns shares the adventures of jock bird, and paints a vivid picture of the changes that were happening to blackfoot society at this time.

read more.


 wed. sept. 22

noon – 1 p.m., mdt

online — southern alberta art gallery is inviting you to a scheduled zoom meeting. 


linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


 

Sept. 30 is recognized as the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, while recognizing Orange Shirt Day, honouring Indigenous people who survived residential school and commemorating the children who never made it home.

 

Connection Circle for MRU Students

The Indigenous Health Community of Practice (IHCoP) in the Faculty of Health, Community and Education is hosting a virtual connection circle for MRU students.

IHCoP is honoured to welcome Elders Roy Bear Chief (Siksika, Blackfoot Nation) and Grandmother Doreen Spece (Saddle Lake, Cree Nation) to guide the circle. All MRU students are welcome and attendance at a previous circle is not required to participate.

This virtual connect circle is an opportunity for all MRU students to share their experiences and be supported by Indigenous Elders.

Elders and an MRU staff/faculty helper will co-facilitate the circle so that everyone has a turn to share in 〜4 rounds; each person takes a turn sharing or "passes" and remains silent or talks without interruption while everyone else listens deeply without judgement; each round ends with the Elders who offer their wisdom with loving kindness-compassion.

Registration required, email hce@mtroyal.ca.


 Fri. Sept. 24

2 – 4 p.m., MDT

 Online. Link will be emailed to registrants.


Andrea Kennedy, Associate Professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery


Cultural Inclusion Centre Welcome Celebration

 Due to COVID-19, this event has been postponed.


Cory Cardinal, coordinator, Cultural Inclusion Centre, SAMRU


Guest Speaker: Chief Cadmus Delorme, Cowessess First Nation

Chief Cadmus Delorme is from the Cowessess First Nation located in Saskatchewan. At the Marieval Indian Residential School, upwards of 751 unmarked graves were uncovered on June 23, 2021, causing a national outcry from First Nation leaders for accountability from the Roman Catholic Church.


 Mon. Sept. 27

1 – 2 p.m., MDT

 Online — Google Live Stream


Andrew Bear Robe, PhD, indigenization consultant, Bissett School of Business


Guest Speaker: Chief Rosanne Casimir, Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc Nation

Chief Rosanne Casimir is from the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc Nation located in British Columbia. The Kamloops Indian Residential School was the first school to uncover 215 children's graves in June 2021. A national shrine was erected with children's shoes, teddy bears, offerings of tobacco and cloth to honour the children that never made it home.


 Mon. Sept. 27

4 – 5 p.m., MDT

 Online — Google Live Stream


 Andrew Bear Robe, PhD, indigenization consultant, Bissett School of Business


Guest Speaker: Elder Ruth Scalp Lock, Siksika Nation

Elder Ruth Scalp Lock is from the Siksika Nation located in Alberta. She is a Crowfoot Indian Residential School survivor and author of My Name is Shield Woman — a hard road to healing, vision and leadership (2014).


 Tues. Sept. 28

1 – 2 p.m., MDT

Online — Google Live Stream


Andrew Bear Robe, PhD, indigenization consultant, Bissett School of Business


Indigenous garden launch

dr. linda manyguns and shane williams, manager, grounds, facilities management will unveil the four garden locations where mru will plant precontact seeds and tobacco in spring 2022.

due to covid-19, the pre-contact food tasting has been postponed.


 wed. sept. 29

2:30 – 3:30 p.m., mdt

 online — google meet


linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Everyone is encouraged to wear an orange shirt

Every Child Matters orange t-shirts are available for purchase at the Cougars Campus Store. A portion of the proceeds from every t-shirt purchased will go to the Orange Shirt Society and MRU's Indigenous Students Emergency Funds.

Launched in 2013, Orange Shirt Day was inspired by Phyllis's story. Its goal is to educate people about residential schools in Canada, learn the truth from survivors and honour the loss of First Nation, Inuit and Métis children who never made it home.


 Thurs. Sept. 30

All day


Orange Shirt Campaign

To visually represent MRU's commitment to reconciliation, Orange Shirts will be displayed around campus.


 Thurs. Sept. 30

All day


Orange Shirt Day Booths with buttons and pamphlets

Due to COVID-19, this event has been cancelled.


Richard Foggo, associate professor, Faculty of Health, Community and Education


Elder Roy Bear Chief reads You Hold Me Up

To honour the children, Espoom Taah (helper), Elder Roy Bear Chief, will come to the Child Development Lab (CDL) to read aloud the book You Hold Me Up to a group of children from the Mount Royal Child Care Centre.

In the spirit of reconciliation, You Hold Me Up is an age-appropriate story written by Monique Gray Smith.

RSVP required. Please email .

liko to ta mapsi pokaiksi (children matter)


 Thurs. Sept. 30

10:30 – 11 a.m., MDT

 Online. Link will be emailed to people that RSVP.


Heather Pollard, coordinator, Child Development Lab, Faculty of Health, Community and Education


Guest Speaker: Phil Fontaine

Due to COVID-19, this event has been postponed.


Andrew Bear Robe, PhD, indigenization consultant, Bissett School of Business


Every Child Matters March

Due to COVID-19, this event has been cancelled.


Steve Kootenay-Jobin, housing and events coordinator, Iniskim Centre


Acknowledging National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Speakers:

  • Tim Rahilly, PhD, President and Vice-Chancellor
  • Elizabeth Evans, PhD, Provost and Vice-President, Academic
  • Linda ManyGuns, PhD, Associate Vice-President, Indigenization and Decolonization

More details to come.


Thurs. Sept. 30

noon – 12:30 p.m.

Online — Watch the Google Live Stream

 


Orange cupcakes

 Due to COVID-19, this event has been cancelled.


Steve Kootenay-Jobin, housing and events coordinator, Iniskim Centre


The Intergenerational Healing Series: Voices of Our Children

Based on his research, Spirt River Striped Wolf will host MRU Indigenous students wanting to share their stories.


 Thurs. Sept. 30

3 – 4 p.m., MDT

Online — Livestream


Spirit River Striped Wolf, president, SAMRU


Campus lit up in orange

To commemorate Orange Shirt Day, MRU will light up the campus in orange.


 Thurs. Sept. 30

Dusk, MDT

Charlton Pond, recreation pool, various lights around campus


 Grant Sommerfeld, associate vice-president, Facilities Management


Blanket Exercise for MRU faculty and staff

Due to COVID-19, this event has been postponed.


 Steve Kootenay-Jobin, housing and events coordinator, Iniskim Centre

 Donna George, manager, Healthy Campus, Wellness Services


 

Sisters in Spirit Day is a national movement by Indigenous women to raise awareness of the violence against Indigenous women, girls and two-spirit, and take a stand against the violence that leads to Indigenous women, girls and two-spirits going missing or being murdered.

 

Everyone is encouraged to wear red.

Everyone is encouraged to wear red clothes showing support to the families of murdered and missing Indigenous women, girls and two-spirit.


 Mon. Oct. 4

All day


Red Dress Campaign

Inspired by Métis artist, Jaime Black's REDress Project, MRU will display red dresses around campus to show support for the lives of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-spirit.


 Mon. Oct. 4

All day


traditional thinkers women’s prayer circle

Due to COVID-19, this event has been cancelled.


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Sisters in Spirit Vigil and March

All are welcome to participate in the Sisters in Spirit vigil and march held in downtown Calgary.

More details to come.


 Mon. Oct. 4

11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Downtown Calgary, City Hall


stardale women’s group — film screening of the road

 mon. oct. 4

3 – 4 p.m., mdt

online — google meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


closing feast

Due to COVID-19, this event has been cancelled.


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


 

The Office of Indigenization and Decolonization is hosting a series of MRU faculty and staff presentions to showcase the indigenization and decolonization work happening in our Faculties, programs, classes or communities.

 

Kimberly Williams, PhD, Associate Professor, Humanities — Women's and Gender Studies

Colonial Redux: The Calgary Stampede’s “Imaginary Indians”

Drawing from my new book, _Stampede: Misogyny, White Supremacy and Settler Colonialism_ (Fernwood 2021), I will show how the representation of local First Nations at the annual Calgary Stampede maps almost exactly onto Anishinaabe journalist Duncan McCue’s (2014) WD4 formula (e.g., W = warrior; the four Ds = dancing, drumming, drinking, and/or dead). This conforms closely to what Métis theorist and cultural critic Chelsea Vowel (2016) has more recently termed “allowable Indigeneity” within settler colonial discourse. The effect, I contend, is to simultaneously create and reify a narrative in which Indigenous presence at and participation in the Calgary Stampede is tangential to its main settler-colonial story.


 Thurs. Sept. 23

11 a.m. – noon, MDT

Online — Google Meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Jennifer Pettit, PhD, Dean, Faculty of Arts

Why Truth and Reconciliation? The History and Legacy of Residential Schools in Canada

More than ever as a result of events such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the ongoing discovery of remains of children on former residential school sites, Canadians are now aware that residential schools existed in Canada. Many though still know very little about this part of Canada’s past, the legacy schools have left, and the impact the residential school system continues to have on Indigenous peoples. This presentation will provide a history of the residential school system with the goal of opening a dialogue about the “truth” part of Truth and Reconciliation, as well as a discussion about what is meant by reconciliation and whether that is possible given Canada’s history of colonization.


 Fri. Sept. 24

10 – 11 a.m., MDT

 Online — Google Meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Karen Pheasant, Associate Professor, General Education

Reconciliation and the Soul Nerve through a Shiibaashka'igan paradigm

Where is your soul in your pedagogy? In this presentation, the discussion will bring a soulful approach to the reconciliation process in the academy.


 Fri. Sept. 24

2 – 3 p.m., MDT

Online — Google Meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Pat Kostouros, PhD, Associate Professor, Bachelor of Child Studies

Labour-based grading as an attempt at decolonizing

In a 4th-year mental health class efforts have been made to recognize the colonized and settler privileged approach to mental health/illness. Since a focus is on decolonizing the mental health system in this class, this year efforts were made to reduce teacher privilege and increase student choice, empowerment, and preference. A labour-based grading approach is used to do so. In this presentation, I will discuss the approach used and the tensions experienced.


 Mon. Sept. 27

11 a.m. – noon, MDT

Online — Google Meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Jessie Loyer, Associate Professor and Librarian, University Library

DeciphAR: the Blackfoot library signage pronunciation app

Have you ever wondered how to pronounce the Blackfoot signage in the Riddell Library and Learning Centre? The library worked with translator Leo Fox and Red Crow Community College to develop DeciphAR, an app that allows your phone to use augmented reality to scan these signs and provide audio translations.


 Mon. Sept. 27

2 – 3 p.m., MDT

Online — Google Meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Travis Hay, PhD, Assistant Professor, Humanities — Indigenous Studies

The Architects of the Residential School System

This talk focuses on the history of the residential school system and the perpetrators who created it. It will also discuss the story of Dr. Peter Bryce, who blew the whistle on the genocidal aspect of this system in 1907.


 Tues. Sept. 28

10 – 11 a.m., MDT

Online — Google Meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Robert Boschman, PhD, Chair, English, Languages, and Cultures

White Coal City

From his recent memoir, White Coal City, Robert will concentrate on passages about his family's participation in the Scoop, adopting his sister Crystal when Robert was ten years old. These passages speak directly to and about the TRC Commission Report of 2015. 

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A moving, unflinching exploration of life in Prince Albert on Treaty Six territory, as told through one family’s multigenerational story.

Robert Boschman grew up in the living quarters of the King Koin Launderette in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, sandwiched between a residential school and a jail built in the aftermath of the Riel Resistance of 1885. White Coal City is the story of this hard hockey-obsessed white-settler town on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River and Boschman’s troubled family who traveled these lands.

Trauma was palpable but never spoken of in the family, and this silence hounded the psychology of its men and boys. Years later, Boschman discovered the reason behind it: the devastating fate of his grandmother, killed by a hit-and-run driver while she was six months pregnant. Her husband, who saw it happen, was plagued by the crime. Their story is gently shared through letters, journal entries, newspaper clippings, and accounts from the coroner’s inquest.

With its penitentiary, sanatorium, pulp mill, and half-built hydro-electric dam, Boschman describes the city of Prince Albert as a “circle of pain”—one felt by white settlers but more so for the generations of First Nations and Métis people in the city and surrounding lands who were forcibly removed, incarcerated, or abducted. The harms of colonialism touched Boschman’s own family; his Cree sister Crystal was adopted by his parents during the Sixties Scoop when she was just a baby. Careful to tell his own story, not hers, Boschman accounts for his family’s own part in Canada’s shameful past. White Coal City is a poetic, necessary exploration of the painful landscapes of colonial cities in Canada.


 Wed. Sept. 29

10 – 11 a.m., MDT

Online — Google Meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Leonzo Barreno, Assistant Professor, Bachelor of Arts — Sociology

The Reconciliation that Never Was: the case of Guatemala

The 1990s were a decade of cultural and political change in Guatemala. Negotiations led to the 1996 Peace Agreement between guerrilla forces and the Guatemalan government after a 36-year Civil War. After a brief period of intense joy and empowerment in the 1990s, the reconciliation between the Indigenous (mostly Mayan) peoples of Guatemala with the state and the dominant elite remains an illusion. This presentation will explain how the oligarchy uses the belief in a “pure blood” ideology to control the state institutions, the economy and even Indigenous intermediaries resulting in extreme poverty for most Indigenous peoples and the counterhegemonic reaction of Indigenous and non-Indigenous groups.


 Fri. Oct. 1

10 – 11 a.m., MDT

Online — Google Meet


 linda manyguns, phd, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 valy fox, administrative assistant and community engagement strategist, office of Indigenization and decolonization


The Journey to Indigenization: Truth, Reconciliation and Decolonization schedule of events is subject to change. If you'd like to receive updates, please fill out this form.