Journey to Indigenization

  • white

sept. 22 to oct. 4, 2022

 

 

sept. 1 —every child matters orange t-shirts are available for purchase at the cougars campus store. A portion of the proceeds goes to the maintenance & care of the white buffalo & mru's Indigenous student emergency fund.

 

support Indigenous writers. purchase an Indigenous-written book from the cougars campus store.

 

materials by Indigenous writers and about indigenization and decolonization will be displayed on the first floor of the riddell library and learning centre and available to borrow. discover more Indigenous collections and resources.

 

a tiptappay stand will be positioned at campus events for people to tap their phone, debit or credit card to donate either $2, $5 or $10 to the Indigenous student emergency fund. discover more ways to donate.

 

oct. 4: wear red

oct. 4: red dress campaign

oct. 4: the canadian library's mmiwg book art installation

oct. 4: sisters in spirit vigil and march

oct. 4: the canadian library mmiwg book art installation talk

oct. 4: stardale’s Indigenous teenage female drummers

oct. 4: closing prayer with wanda first rider

 

 

sept. 26: a racialized settler woman's transformative journey in canada: building relational accountabilities 

sept 26: decolonizing anthropological and archaeological literature in the maya world

sept. 27: use of Indigenous languages in health promotion: benefits and challenges

sept. 27: a department's commitment towards Indigenization and decolonization story

sept. 28: harley's course

sept. 28: responsibilities for decolonial research

sept. 28: the architects of the residential school system

sept. 29: the buckskin ceiling: the native perspective on native art politics

sept. 29: my journey to Indigenous ways of being through land, story, art and tobacco

oct. 3: poetry, politics, and colonization: nicholas flood davin's poetry and the report on industrial schools

oct. 3: decolonizing "storytime"

oct. 3: making it to the frontlines: are university students offering land acknowledgments in the classroom? a closer look at engagement with decolonization practices in a university setting

oct. 3: a review of mru and awe visual gallery of Indigenous women project

oct. 4: Indigenous science and mathematics in gned

oct. 4: ‘all my relations’: elders’ teachings grounding a decolonial bn program philosophy

oct. 4: addressing racism from a kainai perspective

 


journey to Indigenization

since 2021, mount royal university commemorates the signing of treaty 7, national day for truth and reconciliation, orange shirt day and sisters in spirit day within a series of institutional activities over nine days.  

a series of on-campus activities will occur from september 22 to october 4 and will be hosted by the office of Indigenization and decolonization every year. these events will be known as the journey to Indigenization.

the journey to Indigenization aims to provide an opportunity to learn from one another in a series of knowledge infrastructural events. these events showcase the success and innovation in applying, linking and adding Indigenous concepts and epistemological changes to curriculum content at mru. the knowledge and learning will be shared with students, faculty and staff.

download this journey to Indigenization google meet background.

please note the following regarding events:

  • respectfully engage with elders, internal and external mru speakers, staff, students and volunteers.
  • registration is recommended but not required for all events. 
  • events may be recorded.
  • schedule of events is subject to change.

 

 

one of the numbered treaties made between the government of canada and the plains first nations, treaty 7 was signed on september 22, 1877, by the following five first nations: the siksika, kainai, piikani, îyârhe nakoda and tsuut'ina, as did commissioners representing the british crown and canada.

at the time, the canadian government was dedicated to building a transcontinental railway, and treaty 7 permitted tracks to run across the Indigenous lands in what's now known as southern alberta.

many Indigenous people say this was the beginning of the end of their traditional way of life and the start of a new way of life based on treaty cooperation and coexistence with non-Indigenous peoples. we are all treaty people.

 

pipe ceremony and face painting

pipe ceremony and face painting for students includes:

9:30 a.m. flag raising ceremony to commemorate the signing anniversary at the transalta amphitheatre
10 a.m. opening blessing and face painting ceremony at the centennial garden with elder herman yellow old woman and elder pablo russell
12 p.m. the campus community is invited to the open tipi and fall feast 

 thurs. sept. 22

9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

transalta amphitheatre

centennial garden (t-wing courtyard)


 steve kootenay-jobin, Indigenous housing and events coordinator, iniskim centre


the meaning of a treaty with tracy mchugh, siksika nation

event agenda

noon elder prayer with alvin manitopyes (plains cree)
12:15 p.m. event opening with dr. linda manyguns , associate vice-president, Indigenization and decolonization
12:45 p.m. partnerships with dr. moussa magassa, associate vice-president, equity, diversity and inclusion
1:15 p.m. the treaty relationship with tracy mchugh (siksika nation)

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 thurs. sept. 22

noon – 2:15 p.m.

ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


 

sept. 30 is recognized as the national day for truth and reconciliation, while recognizing orange shirt day, honouring Indigenous people who survived residential school and commemorating the children who never made it home.

 

campus lit up in orange

mru will light up the campus in orange to commemorate orange shirt day.


 thurs. sept. 22 – tues. oct. 4

dusk

charlton pond, recreation pool, various lights around campus, east gate and t-wing courtyard tipis


 grant sommerfeld, associate vice-president, facilities management


elder relationships with alvine and spike eagle speaker

elders alvine and spike eagle speaker will speak to the importance of relationships with people, plants and animals. 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 fri. sept. 23

1 – 2:30 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and library centre)


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


elder ruth scalp lock, siksika nation

elder ruth scalp lock is from the siksika nation. she is a crowfoot residential school survivor, and the author of my name is shield woman — a hard road to healing, vision and leadership (2014). 

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 fri. sept. 23

3 – 4:30 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


community futures women’s first nations entrepreneurial research

community futures women’s first nations entrepreneurial research with rob st. denis and star crop eared wolf.

learn about community futures treaty 7.

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 mon. sept. 26

1 – 2:30 p.m.

 w312


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


old sun college mou

old sun college (siksika nation) mou with maurece manyfingers, maria bigsnake and kelly williams-whitt.

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 tues. sept. 27

1 – 2:30 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


cree way of life with alvin manitopyes

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 tues. sept. 27

2:30 – 3:30 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


reconciliation: what does it mean for you?

hosted by the intergenerational speaker series focus of the event is to celebrate treaty 7 territory (calgary and surrounding areas), raise awareness on colonization, increase efforts for decolonization, facilitate learning, and honour the Indigenous peoples of canada through active reconciliation. we hope to create a space that allows participants to connect and collaborate to build community and discuss individual actions that one can take to participate in reconciliation.

guest speakers:

  • tim fox
  • naheed nenshi


 wed. sept. 28

11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

lincoln park room (j301)


 jocelyn rempel, older adult health chair, faculty of health, community and education


judy and jody bear

join fourth-year bachelor of child studies students and twin sisters, judy and jody bear as they talk about their research.

ahkameyimok saving lives: Indigenous hiv oral program

vision: Indigenous hiv oral program provides play therapy and education to increase hiv knowledge, hiv awareness, and hiv safety and improve quality of life. 

mission: saving lives one person at a time and one day at a time. 

project overview: individuals with hiv, a family, or a friend that has hiv do not have to disclose their hiv status due to canada's law against anti-discrimination. "these laws prohibit discrimination against you because you are gay or have hiv. anti-discrimination laws may also protect you from discrimination because of your race, ancestry, place of origin, ethnic origin, colour, citizenship, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status or family status, and mental or physical disability." (caitie, n.d.). the indigenous hiv oral perspective is to teach others using objects, drawings, applying sharing circles, and breaking down hiv how hiv mutates in the human body? do not ever touch or pick up a needle (precautionary safety measures)? where do hiv, hepc, and hepb hide inside a needle? and statistics of hiv rates in Indigenous populations. by eliminating distractions, powerpoints, pamphlets, and cellphone use, individuals can concentrate on the information provided through play therapy, positive reinforcement, and Indigenous oral teachings. for example, an individual riding a bike requires a physical bike and practice to learn how to ride a bike. Indigenous oral teachings provide personal experiences by showing the experience firsthand how to smudge or pray in their culture. oral teachings have been passed down from generation to generation in customs, traditions, language, ceremonies, and tribal beliefs and values.  

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 wed. sept. 28

1 – 2 p.m.

 w330


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


cps partnership with oid on Indigenization

calgary police services partnership on Indigenization — re-design the educational training they’re developing for police officers.

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 wed. sept. 28

2 – 3:30 p.m.

 w330


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


everyone is encouraged to wear an orange shirt

every child matters orange t-shirts are available for purchase at the cougars campus store. this year's orange t-shirts were purchased by snake snitch, an Indigenous-owned and operated siksika nation business.

sold for $29.95; to cover the cost, $15 goes directly to the barn to care for and maintain the white buffalo, $3.76 will cover overhead costs, as well, depending on the shirt purchased, $11.20 of the proceeds will go directly to the mru Indigenous students emergency fund.

launched in 2013, orange shirt day was inspired by phyllis's story. its goal is to educate people about residential schools in canada, learn the truth from survivors and honour the loss of first nation, inuit and métis children who never made it home.


 thurs. aept. 29 and fri. sept. 30

all day


orange shirt campaign

orange shirts will be displayed around campus to represent MRU's commitment to reconciliation visually.


 thurs. sept. 29 – mon. oct. 3

all day


every child matters buttons

every child matters buttons will be available at various locations around campus for students, faculty, staff and the community to pick up. wear a button to honour residential school survivors and the children that never made it home.


 thurs. sept. 29

8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 east gate, main street, west gate and recreation entrances, first-floor riddell library and learning centre, iniskim centre, office of Indigenization and decolonization, samru reception. 


susan garrow-oliver, associate professor, faculty of health, community and education


elder roy bear chief, siksika nation, reads "you hold me up"

to honour the children, espoom tah (helper), elder roy bear chief, will read aloud the book you hold me up to a group of children from the mount royal child care centre.

in the spirit of reconciliation, you hold me up is an age-appropriate story written by monique gray smith.

no registration is required. all are welcome to join.

liko to ta mapsi pokaiksi (children matter)


 thurs. sept. 29

10:30 – 11 a.m.

 UPDATE cougars concourse (2nd floor near cougar statue) 


heather pollard, coordinator, child development lab, faculty of health, community and education


every child matters march

wear an orange shirt and join mru leadership, faculty, staff and students as they march from east gate entrance to centennial garden (t-wing courtyard) to honour residential school survivors and commemorate the children who never made it home.


 thurs. sept. 29

Noon – 12:15 p.m.

start at east gate courtyard


 steve kootenay-jobin, Indigenous housing and events coordinator, iniskim centre

 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


acknowledging national day for truth and reconciliation

following the every child matters march, mount royal will acknowledge the importance of the national day of truth and reconciliation. hear from elders and mru senior leadership.


 thurs. sept. 29

12:15 – 12:30 p.m.

UPDATE main street (between cougars campus store and tim hortons)


 steve kootenay-jobin, Indigenous housing and events coordinator, iniskim centre

 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


orange cupcakes

stop by the iniskim centre, office of Indigenization and decolonization or samru's cultural inclusion centre for an orange cupcake.


 thurs. sept. 29

12:30 – 1 p.m.

 iniskim centre (T110)

office of Indigenization and decolonization (T123)

 cultural inclusion centre, wyckham house (Z203)


 steve kootenay-jobin, Indigenous housing and events coordinator, iniskim centre

linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization

 cory cardinal, cultural inclusion programmer, students association of mount royal university


gardens and grounds walking tour

join khatija westbrook and victoria bouvier on a grounds and garden walking tour. 

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 thurs. sept. 29

1 – 2 p.m

 east gate courtyard


 khatija westbrook, associate professor, department of health and physical education

 victoria bouvier, assistant professor, department of humanities

 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


paulette fox, kainai nation, food sovereignty

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 thurs. sept. 29

2 – 3:30 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


beverly hungry wolf, kainai nation, book "the ways of my grandmother"

commemorating the 40th anniversary of beverly hungry wolf's (kainai nation) book the ways of my grandmother 

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 thurs. sept. 29

3:30 – 4:15 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


gifting Indigenous philosophy and teaching to mru president & vice-chancellor

gifting Indigenous philosophy and teaching to mru's president and vice-chancellor, tim rahilly. this event includes:

  • welcome with paulette fox, (kainai nation), emcee
  • opening prayer with elder alvin manitopyes (plains cree)
  • introduction to Indigenous worldviews and importance of september 30, orange shirt day with linda manyguns
  • story of the philosophy and teaching with hce espoom tah and elder roy bear chief (siksika nation), grandmother doreen spence (saddle lake, cree) and linda manyguns
  • gifting of the philosophy and teaching to president and vice-chancellor, tim rahilly
  • speech from president and vice-chancellor, tim rahilly

feast

following the Indigenous philosophy and teaching gifting, there will be a celebration feast with pre-contact food from purple pastry chef located in the bella lobby of the taylor centre for the performing arts.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 fri. sept. 30

10 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

 double lodge, east gate courtyard — gifting

 bella lobby, taylor centre for the performing arts — feast


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


mru conservatory concert and short film screening

welcome from dr. moussa magassa, associate vice-president, equity, diversity and inclusion


composer’s notes: these two pieces were written in the fall of 2021 in response to the horrific and shocking discovery of the “lost children” in kamloops, bc. like most canadians and people around the world, i felt very deep sorrow and anguish compelling me to express this in music.

  • the day the earth cried* is based on a poem by chief r. stacey laforme from his poetry book living in the tall grass. as a lament for mother earth I felt these words needed to be sung by children to offer their tribute.
    • composed by colleen athparia
    • directed by liz paynter
    • accompanied by sharon fox
    • sung by members of the mount royal arioso children's choir and enchor chamber choire
  • lament for the lost children* is composed for string quartet, piano, trumpet and drums (bass, timpani, snare, chimes), with each instrument representing its own unique expression of spirit in the fabric of this chamber piece. it begins with the heartbeat of the children played by the bass drum representing the essence of their spirit. A chant played by the strings gradually builds into a musical collage of many different colonial religious hymns, even beethoven’s ode to joy, all super-imposed over the drumbeat and chant. this section named tormentation reflects chaos and confusion, building to a dissonant climax of church bells. in the 2nd part floating spirits, the 1st violin rises higher and higher, again soaring to a climax of power, resilience and inner strength of the human spirit. this is followed by a requiem, a prayer for the children’s souls which leads us back to the drumbeat again which gradually fades into the distance but is never extinguished.
    • composed by colleen athparia
    • performed by lily string quartet
      • elisa milner (violin)
      • diane lane (violin)
      • patricia higgins (viola)
      • andrea case (cello)
      • samantha whelan kotkas (trumpet)
      • nia devetzis (percussion)
      • colleen athparia (piano)

these pieces are dedicated to all the “lost children” around the world.

*world premiere performances


there will also be a short documentary film screening of little moccasins, directed by ken matheson and featuring benjamin coleman.

little moccasins is about children honouring first nations children that died and were buried in unmarked graves while attending the dunbow residential school near calgary from 1889 to 1924. elementary students of the strathcona tweedsmuir outreach program while exploring the history of the residential schools are shocked to learn that the dunbow residential school had been located only 15 minutes from their present-day classroom. struggling to come to terms with this dark period in canadian history, the students embark on a journey to honour, give voice and an identity to those first nations children that were buried and forgotten there long ago (imdb, anonymous). runtime: 10 mins.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 fri. sept. 30

1:30 – 3 p.m.

 transalta pavilion (tap), taylor centre for the performing arts


colleen athparia, composer and piano instructor, mru conservatory

 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


cougars men's hockey game

cougars men's hockey team will wear orange shirts as they play university of aberta.

 


 fri. sept. 30

7 p.m.

flames community arena


 austin friesen, engagement and events coordinator, cougars athletic and recreation


blackfoot way of life with kent ayoungman

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. oct. 3

1 – 2 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


îyârhe nakoda way of life with alice kaquitts

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. oct. 3

2 – 3 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


tsuu'tina way of life with bruce starlight

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. oct. 3

3 – 4 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


 

sisters in spirit day is a national movement by Indigenous women to raise awareness of the violence against Indigenous women, girls and two-spirit, and to take a stand against the violence that leads to Indigenous women, girls and two-spirits going missing or being murdered.

 

everyone is encouraged to wear red.

everyone is encouraged to wear red clothes showing support to the families of murdered and missing Indigenous women, girls and two-spirit.


 tues. oct. 4

all day


red dress campaign

inspired by métis artist, jaime black's redress project, mru will display red dresses around campus to show support for the lives of murdered and missing Indigenous women, girls and two-spirit.


 tues. oct. 4

all day


the canadian library's mmiwg book art installation

visit the office of Indigenization and decolonization to view the canadian library’s mmiwg book art installation.

learn how you can be involved in this educational resource.

remnants of the book material are made into hair scrunchies and bookmarks. all sales provide funds to buy more materials. purchase your scrunchie or bookmark from the cougars campus store (in person) or from the canadian library (online).


 tues. oct. 4

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

office of Indigenization and decolonization (T123)


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


sisters in spirit vigil and march

all are welcome to participate in the sisters in spirit vigil and march* held in downtown Calgary.

*this is a community-led initiative; mru has no direct affiliation with this initiative. search online for more detailed information.


 tues. oct. 4

10 a.m. – noon

downtown calgary


the canadian library’s mmiwg book art installation talk

a member of the canadian library will talk about this living art installation initiative created as a memorial to mmiwg and children.
it is intended to start important conversations and help educate all canadians on the true history of canada and the inequalities that still exist today.

*registration is recommended, not required. 

 tues. oct. 4

1 – 2 p.m.

 lincoln park room (j301)


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


stardale's Indigenous teenage female drummers

stardale is an organization that focuses on young Indigenous teenage females. we are honoured to have them drumming for the close of the journey to Indigenization.

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 tues. oct. 4

2:30 – 3 p.m.

 lincoln park room (j301)


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


closing remarks and prayer with wanda first rider, kainai nation

closing remarks and prayer with wanda first rider, followed by a closing feast.

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 tues. oct. 4

3 – 3:30 p.m.

 lincoln park room (j301)


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


 

 

the office of Indigenization and decolonization is hosting a series of mru faculty, student and staff presentions to showcase the indigenization and decolonization work happening in our faculties, programs, classes or communities.

 

a racialized settler woman's transformative journey in canada: building relational accountabilities

dr. jebunnessa chapola
women's, gender and sexualities studies
faculty of arts

this phd dissertation tells the story of my racialized settler woman’s transformative journey toward reconciliation and mutual empowerment through the community in canada. the dissertation discusses how Indigenous Land-based learning became healing and empowering for me as a newly arrived settler woman of a colour, learning about my positioning on the stolen Indigenous. lands of treaty six territory. it recounts the journey of migrating from one colonial land to another, building a family and new community networks, and learning about Indigenous histories, cultures, land-based learning, and about diverse newcomer settler communities in saskatoon, canada. the dissertation discusses how collaborative learning has supported taking responsibility for understanding the meaning of land in solidarity with Indigenous and newcomer communities through involvement in a community garden project, community radio show, and various cultural community activities. using decolonial feminist relational autoethnography as my research methodology, this dissertation discusses my quest to challenge everyday racisms and colonial practices ingrained in the daily lives of newcomer canadians. following 12 years of community activities in treaty 6 and 7 territories, this research emphasizes a key lesson from this life journey: the need to be responsible for understanding the Indigenous meaning of land in order to create belongingness with the land and its original peoples, while resisting the assimilationist forces impacting Indigenous and newcomer communities through their unique histories, despite the orchestrated biases operating through colonialist structures. the author concludes with the hope that the analysis of decolonial, collaborative learning stories and connections with the land may help other non-Indigenous communities build meaningful relationships with the land and Indigenous communities.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. sept. 26

9 – 10 a.m.

 w312


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


decolonizing anthropological and archaeological literature in the maya world

maxime lamoureux-st-hilaire
anthropology
faculty of arts

there are many problems with peer-reviewed literature, with its accessibility (or lack thereof) acting as a conduit for most of those issues. in this presentation, i explore how i strive to craft a more accessible journal — the mayanist — to decolonize anthropological and archaeological literature on contemporary and ancient maya peoples. this effort takes multiple forms. 

first and foremost, the journal is bilingual (english and spanish) and open-access, which greatly facilitates its access to latin american readers. 

second, it is entirely free to publish in the journal, allowing younger and/or unaffiliated scholars to disseminate their research in open-access format. the mayanist is also beautifully illustrated and relatively jargon free in an effort to reach a broader audience. in addition, the journal purposefully makes room for latin american and Indigenous maya scholars and artists. 

finally, the journal's peer-review process is designed to be caring and supportive. as a journal published by a nonprofit (american foreign academic research), there are limits to what we've managed to achieve. yet, our early progress and success with our first seven issues is promising, and hopefully just the beginning.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. sept. 26

10 – 11 a.m.

 w312


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


use of Indigenous languages in health promotion: benefits and challenges

simon habegger
alberta health services

how my community health promotion program began developing a cree resource, the rationale for the resource, and the bureaucratic challenges that had to be surmounted.

our expansion of the initiative to include blackfoot, denesuline, and stoney nakota resources.

the challenges that organizations face when developing such materials, and some recommendations for how to facilitate them: - financial - budgetary - technical - bureaucratic

the benefits and limitations of these materials within the broader canadian context.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 tues. sept. 27

10 – 11 a.m.

 google meet 


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


a department's commitment towards Indigenization and decolonization story

susan garrow-oliver and espoom tah roy bear chief
child studies and social work
faculty of health, community and education

faculty and staff in the department of child studies and social work have embarked on individual and collective journeys toward decolonizing our minds, hearts and approaches to teaching and learning. part of this work comes from looking inward, what we are willing to do, and how our actions contribute to the larger whole. led by espoom tah and blackfoot elder roy bear chief we reflected on our commitments to action and developed the foundation for building a strong tipi. using blackfoot teachings and collective mind a beautiful symbol of our commitment was unveiled this fall to start our new academic year in a good way. join us to hear about how we worked together on this journey and the work that will continue as we move forward.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 tues. sept. 27

11 a.m. – noon

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


harley's course

carol armstrong
biology
faculty of science and technology

this august (2022) i ran the inaugural session of 'harley's course' (biol3201: common ground — learning from the land). my colleague alexandria farmer and i took 18 third-year biology students on a field course to buffalo rock tipi camp to explore the common ground between western science and Indigenous ways of knowing. the planning for this course started in november 2018 and was a group effort (khatija westbrook, charles hepler, dorothy hill and of course, harley bastien — piikani knowledge keeper).

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 wed. sept. 28

10 – 11 a.m.

 w330


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


responsibilities for decolonial research

ranjan datta
decolonial research
faculty of arts

how does one decolonize and reclaim the meanings of research, particularly in the context of Indigenous and racialized community-based research? Indigenous and racialized communities have long experienced misrepresentation by western forms of research. is it possible to build collaborative and meaningful research knowledge that is culturally appropriate, respectful, honouring, and careful of the Indigenous and racialized communities? what are the challenges in western research, researchers, and western university methodology research training? how can our responsibilities benefit both our research communities and us as a researcher?

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 wed. sept. 28

11 a.m. – noon

 w330


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


the architects of the residential school system

travis hay
Indigenous studies
faculty of arts

this presentation offers a historical and fact-based review of the architects of the residential school system. though it will be based on a similar talk i gave last year during journey to Indigenization, it will also include more western canadian references and histories (i.e., the role of hector louis langevin in the residential school system and the politics of changing place-names in the city of calgary).

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 wed. sept. 28

noon — 1 p.m.

 w330


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


the buckskin ceiling: the native perspective on native art politics

alfred youngman
humanities
faculty of arts

a broad examination of how the art and culture of first nations and native americans impact mainstream western ideology in the era of reconciliation and constructing new realities. It is no exaggeration to claim current expressions such as "critical race theory," "structural racism," "systemic racism," and other common refrains are products of what happened in indigenous communities and Indigenous studies (previously known as native american studies) before the new millennia. the deconstruction, reconstruction and decolonization of Indigenous education and history have been happening for over four decades, beginning with the first native american studies departments founded at trent university and the university of lethbridge in the early to mid-1970s where academia had no choice but to reckon with the native perspective. research in the field of first nations/native american art history and theory and its subsequent publications had, what some would say, an unfortunate colonial beginning with anthropology playing the dominant role in the previous century and more. gradually native academics in the nas field begin to play a more significant part in determining the path of mainstream education and how western society views the indigenous of north america, from music to art, to writing, to film to politics. this presentation will emphasize the native perspective as the primary vehicle by which indigenous peoples will chart their road forward, a new direction that native art and theory claim is unique to its history and territories.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 thurs. sept. 29

9 – 10 a.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


my journey to Indigenous ways of being through land, story, art and tobacco

jamie waucaush-warn
humanities
faculty of arts

waucaush-warn shares her own personal journey of decolonization through her own artistic practice that examines story, land, and tobacco. this journey is shared through her own families experience of “survivance” through acts of labour working in tobacco fields after the residential school system that took many of their stories away. the journey to bring these stories to her larger audience is what waucaush-warn is passionate about as they have served to inform the role her family and other Indigenous people have had in the shaping of canada as we know it.  

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 thurs. sept. 29

10 – 11 a.m.

 google meet


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


poetry, politics, and colonization: nicholas flood davin's poetry and the report on industrial schools

michele holmgren
english, languages, and cultures
faculty of arts

while the Irish-born conservative politician nicholas flood davin is now most known for the davin report, he saw himself primarily as a promoter of intellectual and cultural progress in canada. through his speeches, journalism, literary criticism, and poetry, he defended the cultural contributions of Irish emigrants and advocated for irish home rule, citing canada's successful model. however, he saw the settling of the canadian west as essential to canadian nationalism and irish peace. ironically, he continually used his rhetorical and political skills to argue for the forced dispossession and assimilation of first nations and métis peoples. his views that political leaders should guide, shape, and influence education and culture were explicitly linked to the expansion of british imperialism in canada. this presentation will provide a close reading of davin's eos: an epic of the dawn as an illustration of how intellectual work and education can be employed as an active tool of colonization. his writing anticipates current debates about who determines what is taught and studied, and is still relevant today.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. oct. 3

9 – 10 a.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


making it to the frontlines: are university students offering land acknowledgments in the classroom? a closer look at engagement with decolonization practices in a university setting

marcia mckay
child studies and social work
faculty of health, community and education

this study is aimed to examine the paradox of professional social work practice and personal urgency to answer the truth and reconciliation 94 calls to action, in relation to my experience as a postsecondary instructor and trauma-informed practitioner. my recent observations as a university instructor of post-secondary social work students have indicated that students appear hesitant and inconsistent with offering land acknowledgments on their first introductions in the classroom with their peers.

another aspect that will be considered with this phenomenon is the tensions that continue to exist between the truth and reconciliation commission, and the overhaul of educational systems to implement the 94 calls to action. This new way of approaching education has been challenging for systems as they continue to navigate the indigenous alliance with social work and implement change (acsw, 2019).

this study will further emphasize the call to action #65 from the truth and reconciliation commission states that “there is a need to advance the understanding of reconciliation.” this proposal will advance the understanding of reconciliation through the exploration of social work students in post secondary educational systems engagement with land acknowledgments.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. oct. 3

10 – 11 a.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


decolonizing "storytime"

nancy espetveidt
child studies and social work
faculty of health, community and education

i would like to present children's picturebooks that i have chosen to share. i enjoy problemetizing the linear story structure colonized minds have come to expect by presenting wordless picturebooks, books with circular story structure, and books with Indigenous authorship/artistry.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. oct. 3

11 a.m. – noon

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


a review of mru and awe visual gallery of Indigenous women project

amanda williams and richard erlendson
school of communication studies
faculty of business and communications studies

this presentation shares the unveiling of the Indigenous women in business visual exhibition that was celebrated last spring. in this project mount royal university's (mru) school of communication studies, wekh-alberta, and alberta women entrepreneurs partnered to have a senior class of mru journalism and digital media students create a visual gallery of Indigenous women in business. this project was designed to widen the broader public's exposure to the dynamic Indigenous women entrepreneurs who make up the alberta business world. the dynamics of the partnership will be shared as well as the visual gallery.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 mon. oct. 3

noon – 1 p.m.

 ideas lounge (el1270), riddell library and learning centre


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


Indigenous science and mathematics in gned

collette lemieux and nikita kahpeaysewat
bissett school of business  |  4th-year bachelor of science — environmental science student
faculty of business and communications studies  |  faculty of science and technology

we will begin by discussing what brought us to the project and why we believe it is important. then we will describe the evolution of the project and where we are now. finally, we will discuss some of the challenges we've experienced and how we've overcome them (if possible). we will then invite a discussion.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 tues. oct. 4

9 – 10 a.m.

 lincoln park room (j301)


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


‘all my relations’: elders’ teachings grounding a decolonial bn program philosophy

andrea kennedy and grandmother doreen spence
school of nursing and midwifery
faculty of health, community and education

we will share the process of developing a decolonial nursing program philosophical framework. following cultural protocol, we asked two highly respected local Indigenous knowledge holders and retired nurses to serve as presiding elders for the bachelor of nursing (bn) curriculum redesign committee. select committee members engaged with the elders in a series of gatherings. elders gifted ‘all my relations’ as the unifying basis for their teachings of ‘the four realms’ and ‘ani to pisi — spiderweb’ as the new bn program philosophical framework: local Indigenous teachings provide the standpoint for respectfully engaging with interconnected multiple worldviews to advance equity and restore wellness in nursing education. collaboration with elders provides an invaluable opportunity for decolonization in nursing workplaces and learning spaces.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 tues. oct. 4

11 a.m. – noon

google meet (link coming soon)


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization


addressing racism from a kainai perspective

gabrielle lindstrom
humanities
faculty of arts

experiences of anti-Indigenous racism have a long history in blackfoot territories. utilizing the blackfoot language to conceptualize and articulate definitions of racism and what it means to be a fully relational, compassionate and respectful human being, kainai has undertaken research that advances an understanding of racism through a lens that is consistent with the lived experiences and lifeways of kainai peoples. this presentation will offer an overview of the research methodology and findings.

 

*registration is recommended, not required. 


 tues. oct. 4

noon — 1 p.m.

 lincoln park room (j301)


 linda manyguns, associate vice-president, office of Indigenization and decolonization